9yo Alexandra Jordan vs Titstare App: Getting STEM ready for girls

“More girls in STEM!” This has long been the cry, our desperate need to encourage more girls to go in to the STEM fields. We are losing out on some serious brain power and the women who are there face sexism and harassment that could be tempered with gender parity.

But while we talk about more girls in STEM, we don’t talk often enough about the STEM fields becoming more female-friendly. And that is an issue, because I want to celebrate amazing girls like Alexandra Jordan and her playtime app but in doing so I have in the back of my mind that despite her interest and skill, breaking into the STEM fields sometimes requires the students to teach the teachers about gender equality because when STEM students fail to learn that lesson we have the juxtaposition of the developers of Titstare sharing the same stage with girls like Jordan. And girls like Jordan shouldn’t have to share her space with guys who invent an app that lets other guys start at tits while at conferences.

Jordan will grow up and learn all too soon that she could face meager pay and less opportunities for advancement, which seems less harmful than the rape and death threats, or digitally altered pics of her bound and decapitated body like other female programmers and developers have received. All because she is a girl who likes computers.

So you’ll get a big YES! from me when we talk about more girls in STEM fields. Now we just need to get those STEM fields ready for girls.

9yo Alexandra Jordan present her new app that helps parents schedule playdates. You can find it here: http://go.superfunkidtime.com/

These suggestions came from the post, “To my daughter’s high school programming teacher”:

Here are seven suggestions for teaching high school computer programming:

  1. Recruit students to take your class. Why was my daughter the only girl in your class? According to her, she only took the class because I encouraged it. My daughter said she wouldn’t have known about the programming class, otherwise. (I’m adding this to my “parenting win” page in the baby book.) Have you considered hanging up signs in the school to promote your class? Have you asked the school counselors to reach out to kids as they plan their semesters? Have you spoken to other classes, clubs, or fellow teachers to tell them about why programming is exciting and how programming fits into our daily lives? Have you asked the journalism students to write a feature on the amazing career opportunities for programmers or the fun projects they could work on? Have you asked current students to spread the word and tell their friends to try your class?
  2. Set the tone. On the first day of class, talk about the low numbers of women and lack of diversity in IT, why this is a problem, and how students can help increase diversity in programming. Tell students about imposter syndrome and how to help classmates overcome it. Create an inclusive, friendly, safe learning environment from day one. I thought this was a no brainer, but obviously, it’s not.
  3. Outline, explain, and enforce an anti-harassment policy.
  4. Don’t be boring and out-of-date. Visual Basic? Seriously?? Yes, I know I said I’m not writing to complain about your choice of programming languages, even though I’m still scratching my head on this one. The reason I mention your choice is that it doesn’t help you make a good first impression on new programmers. I have no idea what my teen learned in your class because she wasn’t excited about it. Without touching your minuscule class budget, you can offer a range of instruction with real-world applications. With resources like Codecademy, for example, students could try a variety of programming languages, or focus on ones they find interesting. Have you considered showing kids how to develop a phone app? Program a Raspberry Pi? Create a computer game? Build a website? Good grief, man — how were you even able to make programming boring?
  5. Pay attention. I don’t know what you were doing during class, but you weren’t paying attention, otherwise you would have noticed that my daughter was isolated and being harassed. Do you expect girls to come tell you when they are being harassed? Well, don’t count on it. Instead, they pull away, get depressed, or drop out completely, just like they do in IT careers. You want to know what happens when women speak up about verbal abuse or report harassment? Backlash, and it’s ugly. Best case, she’ll get shunned by classmates or colleagues. And hopefully she won’t read any online comments…ever. But it can get much worse, with the vulgar emails and phone calls, and home addresses posted online, and threats of violence. Sadly, this isn’t rare; this happens all the time, from high school on up into our careers. Don’t believe me? That’s because you aren’t paying attention.
  6. Check in. Talk to your students in private to see how class is going for them. Talk to other teachers or school counselors. Had you talked to my daughter’s counselor, for example, you would have known how class was going. The counselor worked closely with my daughter to help her graduate early, and she would have had no problem getting an honest answer about my daughter’s unpleasant experience in your brogramming class. Did you expect me to call you? Believe me, I wanted to, but I also respected my daughter’s request to let her handle the situation. And see number 5. Had I told you how class was going for my daughter, her situation would not have improved, and might have gotten even worse.
  7. Follow up. At the end of the semester, take a survey. Allow students to submit anonymous online answers to questions about the class material, your teaching methods, and their experience with other students. Allowing anonymity will help you get honest answers and, hopefully, you can improve your programming class for your next round of students.

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