More LEGO Female Scientists, Please!

Kids were so excited they each got a set of the hard-to-get LEGO Research Institute with three female scientists.

Kids were so excited they each got a set of the hard-to-get LEGO Research Institute with three female scientists.

Two pieces of updated information regarding the LEGO female scientists ‘Research Institute’ set that I think will be of interest to you. Unfortunately, as of this morning the LEGO website is saying the set is sold out again.

On Friday I made two posts on PPBB facebook page letting my followers know the LEGO female scientists were for sale again in the USA, as well as the UK, and Canada. I know how upset everyone was when we found out the set was a “limited edition” item from LEGO and so many people were not able to order one when they were first made available to the public this fall. (They sold out in three days.)

Last week Friday folks rushed to order and crashed the LEGO website! The PPBB posts were shared hundreds of times and seen by over 45,000 people. Hundreds of comments were left on my threads saying an order had been placed and how happy the child (or adult!) receiving the little female scientists would be.The Research Institute continues to sell out online within hours and I have heard from dozens of people for months that clerks from LEGO stores all over say the set sells out within minutes of the store opening. If and when the scientist sets are in stock, that is.

Hopefully that gets the message to LEGO. One would think with this level of consumer demand the company would be announcing these will be a permanent option stocked with retailers everywhere and the line will be expanding.

An astronomer, a paleontologist, and a chemist make up the Research Institute. LEGO definitely had room to grow with this line.

An astronomer, a paleontologist, and a chemist make up the Research Institute. LEGO definitely had room to grow with this line.

If you haven’t already signed our petition asking LEGO to make these permanent, now is a great time to do so and to pass the petition request along to friends to gain more signatures and momentum. Thank you for using your voice!  Sign here: https://www.change.org/p/lego-lego-make-empowered-female-minifigs-permanent

 

But here’s the REALLY EXCITING news! The original creator of the female scientist set – ‘Alatariel’ – has a new proposal going on LEGO IDEAS: Female Adventure Scientists! (Image below) The minifig set is described as follows:

-The geologist explores the mountains to locate important minerals and unravel the processes that have shaped the Earth.
-The wildlife biologist is on a jungle expedition to study the tiger in its natural habitat.
-The archaeologist investigates bones and artifacts to uncover the secrets of an ancient civilization.

You can vote for the new proposal for more female scientists by visiting https://ideas.lego.com/projects/83039.

Proposed Adventure Scientist set from Alatariel, creator of the Research Institute.

Proposed Adventure Scientist set from Alatariel, creator of the Research Institute.

Public support through LEGO IDEAS (formerly CUUSOO) is how the ‘Research Institute’ came to market and will again send LEGO the message that we want these fantastic and empowering female LEGO character sets to stick around and for the line to grow!

Thanks for all of your support,
Melissa

Ben tackles the T-Rex skeleton.

Ben tackles the T-Rex skeleton.

Amelia hard at work.

Amelia hard at work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melissa Atkins Wardy owns and operates Pigtail Pals & Ballcap Buddies, a small business that wants to change the way people think about childhood. Operated in Wisconsin, where our shirts are printed and shipped with love. If you would like to order empowering apparel and gifts for girls and boys, please visit www.pigtailpals.com.

Find Melissa Atkins Wardy’s book “Redefining Girly: How Parents Can Fight the Stereotyping and Sexualizing of Girlhood, Birth to Tween” here, at your local bookseller or online.

Join the PPBB Community in conversation on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Lego Female Scientists Infuriate Me

An astronomer, a paleontologist, and a chemist make up the Research Institute. LEGO definitely had room to grow with this line.

An astronomer, a paleontologist, and a chemist make up the Research Institute. LEGO definitely had room to grow with this line.

Truth be told, I haven’t been able to give Amelia her Lego female scientist set yet. I’ve been hiding it for months. Ben wants one too, and I was only able to get one. So which kid should get it? The girl who needs to see continuous and encouraging reinforcement that women have a place in STEM fields? The set even includes a female paleontologist and T-Rex, like her beloved Sue skeleton from the Field Museum in Chicago. (The most complete T-Rex skeleton ever found and was discovered by a women, fyi.)

Or does my son get it, because he sees so few representations of smart, successful females in children’s media? They could share it, of course, but that only further reinforces how little there really is to go around. And THAT. That is what makes me angry. Like, Hulk angry.

There are eleventy boxes of Ariel’s Magical Kiss and Cinderella’s Castle on the shelf, but finding a box with three female scientists? Good luck with that. Could they make their own scientists and labs from the Legos they already have? Yes and they do, which is why they were so bonkers for this set. I think I’m having such a hard time giving this to my kids because after they go nuts over it and ask for more, I have to tell them, “That’s it. It is just this one. There is no more.”

What a crappy thing to have to tell my science-loving, Lego-obsessed kids that the female scientist thing was just a flash in the pan, not a lasting idea for the world’s largest toy company.

From a friend of a PPBB Community Member:
“My friend just found the Lego female-scientist set at the Mall of America and said she arrived at the Lego Store a few minutes before opening, thinking she’d just ask if they had any and they had ten. The guy in front of her tried to buy five sets, but it’s one per customer. They sold four the first three minutes the store was open.
No wonder people can’t find them, if the store is capable of selling all ten set within FIVE minutes of being open. And this was the **Lego Store**. How can you imagine it’s not a profitable product?”

If the company is only making limited edition sets to drive up value and consumer demand, especially before the holidays, what does that say about our general society? Parents will have to claw and scratch at each other to get their hands on a scarce $20 set of little bricks because their commitment to empowering their daughters and hunger for great STEM toys for girls is so great they’ll totally lose sight of the fact that girl scientists shouldn’t be the rare, toy equivalent of a unicorn.

Toy girl scientists should just be the norm.

The LEGO Research Institute continues to sell out within minutes of being available.

The LEGO Research Institute continues to sell out within minutes of being available.

LEGO’s Female Scientists Here and Gone In Two Weeks

The public learned via a New York Times article last week that toy giant LEGO would cease production of the enormously popular LEGO Ideas Research Institute featuring three female scientists. People are shocked, frustrated, and not shy about expressing their outrage at the company who seemed to finally be listening to hundreds of thousands of consumers saying they wanted this very product. LEGO has announced this was only a limited edition and would not be mass produced nor sold nationally at retailers. And we’re all left wondering, why is LEGO walking away from sales for an item in such high demand? And why stop production and cripple availability right as stores are placing their holiday toy orders?

Sign the petition asking LEGO to save the scientists and keep this set in production and available to consumers.

The LEGO Research Institute sold out at $19.99 within days of release.

The LEGO Research Institute sold out at $19.99 within days of release.

The set was brought to production after LEGO fans and consumers cast well over the 10,000 votes needed to push the prototype to the next round of consideration for production. It was such a hullabaloo the story made national headlines at the time and then again when the set of the STEM based female minifigs was available for purchase. Despite customers being limited to one set per purchase the item still sold out in a few days. All over social media customers were making comments about needing several more sets as Christmas or birthday gifts and stores were inundated with calls asking if they stocked the item. After heavy criticism for its Friends line LEGO was getting great press for finally doing right by girls and supporting the girl empowerment movement that has been wildly popular for other brands like Goldie Blox, Verizon, Lands’ End and Always.

While the LEGO Friends line has greatly improved from the first sexist, stereotyped sets offering girls the lowest common denominator of girlhood, their ‘girls’ line is still highly gendered and does not provide the gender equitable toy experience so many parents advocate for today. The new Friends jungle series shows girls being active, adventurous, intelligent, and using technology to rescue cute animals. While the new direction of the Friends line seems to align better with what parents are asking for for their daughters, it still has a different feel from the Research Institute set. Every week there seems to be an article about a new study on the disparagingly low numbers of women entering and remaining in STEM fields despite that expertise being the future for high wage earners and the future of the economy in general. As the New York Times says, “Lego is demonstrating this summer that role models in science and technology for girls are still fairly scarce in toy land, just as in the real world.”

Sign the petition asking LEGO to save the scientists and keep this set in production and available to consumers.

In the real world LEGO is a $4 billion giant in the toy industry, one whose brand has enormous influence over what is marketed to children and what children play with which is why strong female characters are important for both girls and boys to see represented in LEGO toys. Research has shown the importance of the depiction of empowered female characters in children’s toys and media as they learn about and absorb culture while they grow. A large section of LEGO’s customer base is female, an even larger section have used their voices and wallets consistently for three years to communicate they are wanting, ready for, and will purchase sets like the sold out LEGO Ideas Research Institute featuring three female scientists. 

 

An astronomer, a paleontologist, and a chemist make up the Research Institute. LEGO definitely had room to grow with this line.

An astronomer, a paleontologist, and a chemist make up the Research Institute. LEGO definitely had room to grow with this line.


Awareness of the importance of encouraging girls into STEM fields is at an all-time high and millions of parents across the globe are advocating for more gender equal toy aisles. It is important to myself and my family that LEGO honor its customers when we say we want and will continue to make successful sets which feature female minifigs depicted as smart, daring, and adventurous. We want sets like the LEGO Ideas Research Institute to be a long time fixture on toy shelves everywhere. 

Over 111,000 people have signed petitions in recent years to LEGO requesting more empowered female minifigs in LEGO sets.

Tens of thousands more voted online through LEGO Ideas to have these available for purchase.

Thousands of people purchased the Research Institute featuring the three female scientists and within days of release they were sold out.

Yet just two weeks after the release we’ve learned that LEGO isn’t going to make this set anymore.

Which leaves the consumer asking “WHY??” and questioning what message is Lego sending its customers about how much it values our voices very clearly asking for representation of more smart and strong female figures in building sets. Maybe the more important question to be asked is, “How much does LEGO really value its female builders and cultivating a new generation of builders?”

LEGO could be a thought leader in the toy space by making gender equity a mainstay in its brand, something parents by the millions have been asking for for years. LEGO, be the brand we are wanting you to be, be the brand we remember from our childhood, the brand we want for our children.

Sign the petition asking LEGO to save the scientists and keep this set in production and available to consumers.

 

 

Melissa Atkins Wardy owns and operates Pigtail Pals & Ballcap Buddies, a small business in Wisconsin, where our shirts are printed and shipped with love.

If you would like to order empowering apparel and gifts for girls and boys, please visit www.pigtailpals.com.

Find Melissa Atkins Wardy’s book “Redefining Girly: How Parents Can Fight the Stereotyping and Sexualizing of Girlhood, Birth to Tween” on Amazon.

Join the PPBB Community in conversation on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Image source.

Lego: Magical Prince Kisses Instead of Adventurous Mermaid Princesses

While visiting the Chicago Lego store this weekend:

“MOM! They have Merida and Ariel Legos!” -7yo Original Pigtail Pal Amelia

“Really? Oh yeah, there is Merida and the bear cubs and her bow, that is cool. It says Highland Ga….” -Me

“Oh I beg your pardon! That isn’t Ariel. That is when she is a human. She isn’t even a mermaid there!” -OPP

“Um, let me look at the box. Yeah, you are right, she isn’t a mermaid. This is after she has given away her voice and her tail to go on land as a human to kiss some dude she’s never spoken to before.” -Me

“Right? Who does that? I wouldn’t give up my dad or tail to chase some hot guy on a boat. I don’t want this. And I can’t have a boyfriend because I’m seven. But can I get Merida? Because she is a girl like me. You know, someone needs to talk to these people and tell them the business. This is not how you make smart girls. All ‘oooh, oooh I see a prince and now I’m going to be his wife’. GIVE ME A BREAK! What if she wants to keep swimming in the ocean? Or do science? Who makes this stuff? I need to tell them the business. Ariel is a mermaid who wants adventure. That is what all mermaids want.” -OPP

“And she was curious and collected things she discovered around the ocean. But that isn’t what they are selling to girls with this set, is it?”-Me

“Oh. Oh ho ho. I’ll tell you what they are selling, alright.” -OPP

The big Ariel set focuses on a magic kiss, not the adventurous, curious princess.

The big Ariel set focuses on a magic kiss, not the adventurous, curious princess.

I did go on Lego’s website and they do have a small set with Ariel as the mermaid coming January 2014. Nowhere as elaborate as Ariel’s Magical Kiss, however. Much to the disappointment of my mermaid-loving, head-exploding seven year old daughter.

Also? Does the row boat seriously need to be pink?

Some great comments from our Facebook Community when we discussed this:

“The unholy alliance between LEGO and Disney is really upsetting. You have to wonder, will we soon have Disney princess tinker toys and Disney princess Lincoln Logs and Disney princess chess sets. I know all those things are already available in pink “for girls” editions, and it’s just a matter of time before, say, the only way a girl can possibly be taught chess is if the pieces are princesses. This train is not slowing down.”  – Lori Day, author of  “Her Next Chapter: How Mother-Daughter Book Clubs Can Help Girls Navigate Malicious Media, Risky Relationships, Girl Gossip, and So Much More”

“Nothing says age-appropriate marketing like selling a set (aimed at young girls) that essentially says guys kissing ladies who don’t have the voice to give consent is okay… if you want to be a princess who lands the prince, anyway. The whole “Magical Kiss” set isn’t really age appropriate. Why are retailers selling kissing and romance to a young audience at all? Personally, I am a fan of Merida: she wants to be a girl first and doesn’t want to be rushed into an engagement or marriage immediately. She is a positive female character that girls can look to that doesn’t require love at first sight or a happily ever after with a prince. The ending highlights the importance of family and being adventurous and full of awesome just as we are. Most other Disney princesses (Ariel among them) do not carry this same message. This isn’t to say other princesses don’t have great qualities (they do!), but just that the romantic element shouldn’t be what retailers focus on for our youngest consumers. ” -Erin Wolf

“We got the LEGO catalog in the mail the other day. The LEGO Disney sets include: Cinderella’s Castle ($70.00), Merida’s Highland Games ($19.99), Ariel’s Amazing Treasures ($12.99), Cinderella’s Dream Carriage ($29.99) and Rapunzel’s Creativity Tower ($39.99). This is another reason why we buy mostly bricks and not sets.” -Chris Singer

“I got my daughter a tree house kit from the LEGO Creator line. She squealed and hugged me so hard, I nearly cried to see my kid so happy.” -Gabrielle Tenn New

“Wasn’t she wearing blue during this scene? Can’t they at least have her in the correct outfit? Or would blue be too masculine?” -Elizabeth Dale

The other (considerably smaller) set for Ariel that (barely) highlights her positive qualities.

The other (considerably smaller) set for Ariel that (barely) highlights her positive qualities.

For The Love of Warriors and Mermaids

For the past two weekends our family has held a big garage sale and the kids, 7yo Amelia and 5yo Benny, have been incredible helpers so they have earned a bit of spending money. With no independent toy store in town the kids headed to Toy R Us to spend their hard earned cash. Benny was all over the Angry Birds plushes, making weird bird noises the entire time he shopped. Amelia strolled through the Barbie aisle, the Princess aisle, the Star Wars aisle, art section and the science kit section before finally deciding on LEGO.

We compared LEGO City sets, Stars Wars sets, and Friends sets as she tried to stay within her budget. She had finally made her choice when she saw the box of collectible Minifigs where a mermaid and a Merida-looking figure were featured. All bets were off, and she started feeling every little foil packet for the two female Minifigs hiding inside.

LEGO Minifig series 9, with Merida and "Forest Maiden". I called her a Celtic warrior.

Amelia and I stood in front of the display for close to twenty minutes feeling every single package in the hopes of finding two little adventurous Minifigs for Amelia’s expanding LEGO collection. The child is obsessed with mermaids and Merida, I didn’t have the heart to tell her no. That is what a girl has to do these days for adventurous female Minifigs, if she wants something other than LEGO Friends and doesn’t want to spend extra time and money ordering special parts online.

As we stood there feeling the packages, we talked about why there were five females out of 16 Minifigs and what was special about each female featured. We talked about why roller derby is awesome and how tough derby girls are. We talked about the alien and starship fighter possibly being girls. We talked about women being able to be police officers, judges, and mad scientists.

While we stood there a grandmother and her granddaughter walked up, the little girl wearing a sparkling tiara. Amelia asked if it was her birthday, and the little girl answer shyly, “No, I’m just a princess today.” Amelia smiled at her, then returned to her LEGO hunt. The grandmother then said, “You are a  princess every day, aren’t you, Princess?”

I mustered a fake smile for grandma and then looked down at the little girl and said, “I love your tiara, it is beautiful. Maybe you could pretend that you are a queen one day. Queens have all the real power. You could rule over all of the adventurous princesses.” I said it as much for grandma as I did for the little girl.

The little girl giggled and then spun around to show off her shoes, but lost her balance and crashed into a display of LEGO boxes. The grandma grabbed her quickly and said, “Sweetie don’t get your clothes dirty, now. We don’t want that.”

At that moment a store employee walked up and commented on the girl’s tiara, but did so in an interesting way. She said, “Wow! I like your tiara. Are you pretending to be a princess today? What will you pretend to be tomorrow?” I loved how she left room for the girl to be other things besides a princess, but made being a princess okay, too. Just one slice of the pie.

The employee then noticed what Amelia and I were up to, laughed, and asked which Minifigs we were after. “The mermaid and Merida, because I like brave things,” Amelia answered and then stared a conversation with the employee about her LEGO collection and what kinds of things she liked to build. The employee and I said we both wanted the roller derby girl.

Mr. Pigtail Pals walked up at that point as asked what was taking so long, and Amelia explained what we were looking for. I caught him as he looked down at his little girl, bouncing in excitement over having two new heroines to play with. His eyes softened and he looked up at me, knowing I wasn’t about to give up or tell her it didn’t matter and that we needed to leave for dinner.

While Amelia went on and on about her LEGOs and how much she loves building things, I found both the mermaid and the Celtic warrior (LEGO technically has her labeled as ‘Forest Maiden’, but I’m taking a more Boudica-like approach and calling her a warrior) after going through 75 packets or so. Happy dancing commenced.

I was pretty sure I had guessed on the correct packets, so I knelt down and told Amelia that I thought I had them, but in case I got them wrong we wouldn’t be coming back in to the store to buy more. It was a one shot deal. I asked her what things she would build for her mermaid and warrior. She answered that she would build two fortresses, one underwater and one in the woods and the two would be “queens who are nice to each other”. I said that sounded like  a plan.

“Mama, thank you for taking the time to find me some brave girls,” my seven year old looked up at me and smiled.

“Any day, every day, Smalls. You are worth it,” I said and smiled down at her.

Twenty minutes and $7 later, my daughter had the heroines she so desperately wanted for her LEGO stories.

Happy ending, but wouldn’t it be great it LEGO made it easier for families like mine who have kids who want more female Minifigs to just go out and buy them, in say, little packets or building sets? Sign our petition asking LEGO to do just that.